Ranthambore National Park

Initially a hunting ground for the royal families of the Rajput kingdom, Ranthambore National Park today stands as one of the biggest and most loved national parks of North India.

History and Origin of Ranthambore National Park

Located in the Sawai Madhopur district of Rajasthan, the park was initially a wooded hunting ground, selected by the Rajput ruler Sapaldaksha as the site for his fort. Today we still see this as the Ranthambore fort, an annual pilgrimage for the locals. By the 20th century, growth in human population brought threat to the forest areas and that’s why in 1939 Jaipur Forest Act made grazing and tree-felling in forest areas reserved for royal hunting illegal. However, this act was left unheeded and only in 1953 with the introduction of the Rajasthan Forest Act did the government take some serious measures for conservation and protection of the area. To enforce stringency in execution, this was then established as Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973. Ranthambore National Park was honoured the status of National Park in 1980 and in 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include the Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries.

Terrain of Ranthambore National Park

Tucked away between the Aravalli and the Vindhyan hill systems in the Sawai Madhopur district of eastern Rajasthan, the Ranthambore National Park occupies a core area of about 282 sq. km and constitutes a small part of the 1334 sq. km of area Ranthambore Tiger Reserve. The Chambal River forms a natural boundary of the park towards the east. An uneven terrain of dry deciduous forests interspersed with rocky terrains and soaring cliffs adds a dramatic effect to its landscapes, like no other park of India. A majority of the tree cover is provided by species such as Mango, Imli, Babul, Banyan, Jamun. Mahua etc. Owing to sparse and dry vegetation it is easier to spot tigers in their wild habitat. This fact and attention by government and organizations have been responsible for international recognition being bestowed on the park.

Flora and Fauna of Ranthambore National Park

The reserve is home to over 40 species of mammals, 300 species of birds, 45 species of reptiles and over 300 species of plants. Ranthambhore was established as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by the Government of India and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973 Ranthambore became a national park in 1980. In 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include the Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries

Did you know?

The Ranthambore Fort is a unique landmark with a rich tradition that dates back to 944 AD to the times of the Rajput king Sapaldaksha of Chauhan Dynasty, who laid the founding stone of the fort. The construction was subsequently carried out by various Rajput rulers to give rise to one of the most fortified structure, unconquerable by the Mughals for long. Finally, in 1301, Alauddin Khilji, the then sultan of Delhi, brought an end to the mighty rule of Chauhans by conquering this fort. Even till date the humongous structure boasts of the ways of the Rajput warriors. A 32-pillar canopy (locally known as ‘battis kambha chhattri’still stands erect in the ruined premises of the fort.

Initially a hunting ground for the royal families of the Rajput kingdom, Ranthambore National Parks todays stands as one of the biggest and most loved national parks of North India.

History and Origin

Located in the Sawai Madhopur district of Rajasthan, the park was initially a wooded hunting ground, selected by the Rajput ruler Sapaldaksha as the site for his fort. Today we still see this as the Ranthambore fort, an annual pilgrimage for the locals. By the 20th century, growth inhumanpopulation brought threat to the forest areas and that’s why in 1939 Jaipur Forest Act made grazing and tree-felling in forest areas reserved for royal hunting illegal. However, this act was left unheeded and only in 1953 with the introduction of the Rajasthan Forest Act did the government take some serious measures for conservation and protection of the area. To enforce stringency in execution, this was then established as Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973. It was honoured the status of National Park in 1980 and in 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include the Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries.

Terrain

Tucked away between the Aravalli and the Vindhyan hill systems in the Sawai Madhopur district of eastern Rajasthan, the Ranthambore National Park occupies a core area of about 282 sq. km and constitutes a small part of the 1334 sq. km of areaRanthambore Tiger Reserve. The Chambal River forms a natural boundary of the park towards the east. An uneven terrain of dry deciduous forests interspersed with rocky terrains and soaring cliffs adds a dramatic effect to its landscapes, like no other park of India. A majority of the tree cover is provided by species such as mango, imli, babul, banyan, jamun. mahua etc. Owing to sparse and dry vegetation it is easier to spot tigers in their wild habitat. This fact and attention by government and organizations have been responsible for international recognition being bestowed on the park.

Flora and Fauna

The reserve is home to over 40 species of mammals, 300 species of birds, 45 species of reptiles and over 300 species of plants.Ranthambhore was established as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by the Government of India and was declared one of the Project Tiger reserves in 1973 Ranthambore became a national park in 1980. In 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include the Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries

Did you know?

The Ranthambore Fort is a unique landmark with a rich tradition that dates back to 944 AD to the times of the Rajput king Sapaldaksha of Chauhan Dynasty, who laid the founding stone of the fort. The construction was subsequently carried out by various Rajput rulers to give rise to one of the most fortified structure, unconquerable by the Mughals for long. Finally, in 1301, Alauddin Khilji, the then sultan of Delhi, brought an end to the mighty rule of Chauhans by conquering this fort. Even till date the humongous structure boasts of the ways of the Rajput warriors. A 32-pillar canopy (locally known as ‘battis kambha chhattri’still stands erect in the ruined premises of the fort